The hypothalamus is a crucial region for integrating signals from central and peripheral pathways and plays a major role in Appetite regulation.

The hypothalamus is a crucial region for integrating signals from central and peripheral pathways and plays a major role in Appetite regulation.

Vitamin D deficiency is often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia (chronic widespread pain and a heightened and painful response to pressure.)

The association between low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and non-specific musculoskeletal pain, including fibromyalgia syndrome, is controversial. Several studies have reported a “positive association” and two others found “no association.”

Enhancing oncology treatment through PPP – The Financial Express.

Enhancing oncology treatment through PPP – The Financial Express.

AceProbe Technologies in the first ever PPP endeavour in India, after an experience of over 5 years as a PPP model for support with Govt. of India.

The company has invested in a 100 percent genomics facility at Tata Memorial Centre- ACTREC mumbai to help support the cause to provide better support and affordable healthcare in the country!

Eight signs of losing battle against cancer | Zee News

Eight signs of losing battle against cancer | Zee News.

Dr Puneet Chandna: it is believed, Patients in the last days/hours of life often have unrelieved physical suffering, as well as significant emotional, spiritual, and social distress. Recognising that a person is entering the imminently dying or terminal phase of their illness is critical to appropriate care planning, with a shift to comfort care. Defining when this phase begins is not always straightforward. Patients at the end of life are frequently not recognised as dying. As a result, suffering may not be properly appreciated or managed, and the patient’s overall condition may even be exacerbated by the continuation of standard medical care.  

Enhancing oncology treatment through PPP – The Financial Express

Enhancing oncology treatment through PPP – The Financial Express.

AceProbe Technologies in the first ever PPP endeavour in India, after an experience of over 5 years as a PPP model for support with Govt. of India.

The company has invested in a 100 percent genomics facility at Tata Memorial Centre- ACTREC mumbai to help support the cause to provide better support and affordable healthcare in the country!

Is it true ?- We can avoid RT in Breast Cancer: ‘Practice-Changing Tipping Point’- PRIME II Trial result??

metanalysisSome older women with early-stage breast cancer might be able to skip radiation therapy after breast-conservation surgery, according to a phase 3 randomized controlled trial.

The study, known as PRIME II, demonstrated a modest but statistically significant reduction in cancer recurrence in women who received radiotherapy, compared with those who did not. However, 5-year overall survival was similar in the two groups.

The results were published online January 28 in the Lancet Oncology.

Dr Kabat- On Patient Adherence to Cancer Prevention Guidelines-But adhering to the guidelines was not always associated with lower risk!

Geoffrey Kabat, PhD, MS

Today we are speaking with Geoffrey Kabat, PhD, MS, a cancer epidemiologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. Dr. Kabat and colleagues are the authors of a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that examined adherence to the American Cancer Society’s cancer prevention guidelines in relation to risk of cancer, cancer mortality, and total mortality. 

FDA approves new drug for breast cancer -Is Very Good News For Women With Metastatic Breast

fda-164ibrance

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier today approved the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer.

“The addition of palbociclib to letrozole provides a novel treatment option to women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer,” said Richard Pazdur, MD, director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, in a press release. “The FDA is committed to expediting marketing approval of cancer drugs through our accelerated approval regulations.”

The randomized phase II trial that led to the approval included 165 postmenopausal patients with metastatic ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer assigned to either letrozole plus palbociclib or letrozole alone. Patients received a 125-mg daily dose of palbociclib and a 2.5-mg daily dose of letrozole.

Treatment with palbociclib led to an improved progression-free survival (20.2 months vs 10.2 months). Overall survival data are not yet available.

Results of this trial were originally presented at the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

Common adverse events among patients treated with palbociclib included decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, alopecia, anemia, fatigue, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, epistaxis, asthenia, peripheral neuropathy, and upper respiratory infection.

Palbociclib is also being studied in two phase III trials: PALOMA-2 is testing palbociclib with letrozole and fulvestrant in late-stage metastatic breast cancer patients who have failed endocrine therapy, and PENELOPE-B is testing palbociclib in combination with standard endocrine therapy in hormone receptor–positive breast cancer patients with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery.

– See more at: http://www.cancernetwork.com/news/fda-approves-palbociclib-advanced-breast-cancer?GUID=D4302503-F386-4AD9-9735-D7EDD2C5AE3B&rememberme=1&ts=04022015#sthash.6CiUVKWY.dpuf

Combine and Conquer | Therapy yields reduction in HER2+ breast cancer recurrence

Combine and Conquer | HMS.

Therapy yields reduction in HER2+ breast cancer recurrence

Image: iStock/AngiePhotosImage: iStock/AngiePhotos

In a phase two clinical trial, women with small (stage one) HER2-positive breast tumors who received a combination of lower-intensity chemotherapy and a targeted drug following surgery were highly unlikely to have the cancer recur within three years of treatment, investigators at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report in a paper published Jan. 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The findings may help establish the therapy—which combines the chemotherapy agent paclitaxel and the targeted drug trastuzumab (Herceptin)—as the first standard treatment approach for this group of patients, the authors state.

Get more HMS news here.

Many previous studies excluded women with small HER2-positive breast tumors that hadn’t spread to nearby lymph nodes from clinical trials of trastuzumab because it wasn’t considered prudent to expose them to an investigational drug given the relatively low risk that the disease would recur. Without a single standard treatment for this group of patients, treatment approaches have varied widely. Breast cancers are classified as HER2-positive if their cells have surplus human epidermal growth factor receptors on their surface, making them extra sensitive to signals to grow and divide.

“Women with small HER2 positive, node-negative breast tumors have a low, but still significant, risk of recurrence of their disease,” said the study’s senior author, Eric Winer, HMS professor of medicine and director of the Breast Oncology Program at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber. “This study demonstrates that a combination of lower-intensity chemotherapy and trastuzumab—which is associated with fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy regimens—is an appealing standard of care for this group of patients.”

The study enrolled 406 patients with HER2-positive, node-negative breast tumors smaller than 3 centimeters. They were treated with the drug combination for 12 weeks, followed by nine months of trastuzumab alone. Traditional drug regimens for women with HER2-positive breast cancer involve chemotherapy with adriamycin and cytoxan followed by paclitaxel and trastuzumab.

Three years after completing therapy, 98.7 percent of the participants were alive and free of invasive breast cancer. The side effects were generally milder than those associated with traditional chemotherapy regimens.

“We’re committed to identifying treatment regimens that are geared not only to the specific biological features of a woman’s cancer, but also to the stage of the cancer—the size of the tumor and how far it has advanced,” said the study’s lead author, Sara Tolaney, HMS instructor in medicine at the Susan F. Smith Center. “This study is a prime example of the value of that approach.”

Financial support for the research was provided by Genentech and Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Adapted from a Dana-Farber news release.

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